Bulletin Boards For The Modern Classroom

18 May

Bulletin boards are a common feature in a large number of classrooms today. Bulletin boards have since become an integral component of the learning process, especially for young learners in their early stages of education.

With this in mind, it is important for trainee kindergarten teachers to understand the various types of classroom bulletin boards and the applications for which the different boards are suited.

Display Bulletin Boards

True to their name, these bulletin boards are often used to showcase outstanding work from the young learners (e.g. drawings and essays). In a large number of cases, display bulletin and white boards are installed outside the classroom so that their content is seen by a larger percentage of the student population.

Luckily for teachers, there’s not much effort involved in ensuring that content on a display bulletin board remains relevant. This is for the simple reason that such content is student-generated. Teachers only need to ensure that the work displayed on these boards is changed on a regular basis.

Informational Boards

Also true to their name, informational bulletin boards will contain specific information on a particular subject (e.g. parts of leaves). Informational bulletin boards are often used to help young learners to comprehend and to remember concepts that may seem complex. For this reason, content on informational bulletin boards is often presented in the form of diagrams.

In order to ensure that they get the most out of an informational bulletin board, teachers should strive to minimize the visual clutter on these boards. Highlighting the most important diagrams and/or text will also help to draw the attention of the young learner to the most relevant section(s) of the bulletin board.

Interactive Bulletin Boards

Interactive bulletin boards allow young learners to have an active involvement in the manipulation of content placed on the board and its general use. Thus, there are certain factors that a teacher should consider when installing interactive bulletin boards within the classroom. These factors include, but they’re not limited to the following:

  • Accessibility: For an interactive bulletin board to be useful, a young learner shouldn’t have to strain to reach it. A well-installed interactive bulletin board should be installed at the student’s eye-level
  • Colour: In order to maintain their active involvement with interactive bulletin boards, young learners need something that will keep them visually interested in the board. The best way to maintain this interest is to add well- coordinated colours and colour schemes.

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